When Branding Goes Wrong

when branding goes wrong

When branding goes wrong, it can be a very frustrating situation. I totally get it! You’re trying to do your best to tell your people what you do and how you help them. But perhaps you’re confusing them or fire-hosing them with too much information. A great brand is intentional, visual, and impactful.

In my last article, I discussed how branding helps you communicate how you stand out from your competitors. You want to stand out positively!  That means you lean into your strengths and true identity and exploit it to magnetize the people who value you.

That’s all and good!  However, while branding has the power to clarify, it also has the power to confuse.

Branding certainly goes wrong when the message doesn’t match the product or service.  When a brand causes a person to think twice, you’ve immediately got your client in confusion land.  

Wait, what do you sell?

How do you do it?

Who do you work with?

Can you help me, and how do you help me?

How much does it cost again?

And, what do I get?

Confusion land leads to “no.”

For example, if I were a luxury car salesperson selling extravagant Cadillacs, it would make sense to match the brand.  

People would question my employer and me if I sold cars wearing a dirty sweatshirt and messy hair.  Leave that look at home.  It does not convey luxury!

When done appropriately for the right, lucrative niche, branding can lead to price increases. What a huge benefit! That’s exactly why message alignment matters.

Perhaps you feel this is a bit judgy.  I can sense that too.  

But remember, branding isn’t just about us.  It’s a communicative tool because it says, “This is who I am, this is what I do, and most importantly, this is how I help you achieve the transformation you want.  

Branding is successful when it attracts those who appreciate our style and repels those who do not.  Let’s not waste time attracting people who don’t get us.  
In my next article, I will share more on where branding is unsuccessful.  People can spot fake a mile away.  It takes a lot of energy to maintain a false persona. 

Learn More with Me!

Published by Janet Johnson | Financial Coach for Small Businesses

Janet Johnson is the author of My Money Pivot: An Entrepreneur's Guide to Finding & Making More Money. Before becoming a coach, Janet gained seventeen years of experience in a family-owned manufacturing company. She also trained small business owners in Financial Management and Lean Enterprise for seven years through contracts with the State of Connecticut and the Small Business Administration for seven years.

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